Nine Characteristics Of An Effective Leader

Nine Characteristics Of An Effective Leader

The behaviors of effective leaders are clear, practical and learnable. In fact, you may already be exhibiting some of the nine characteristics. An effective leader:

1. Stays Calm. An effective leader remains composed and dependable, especially when under pressure. This characteristic is so fundamental that a leader needs to master it before he is able to portray other characteristics.

2. Accepts the Individual.  Effective leaders show caring for the human being before focusing on the issue or problem. They separate the person from the problem. As far as possible, they avoid judging and criticizing people.

3. Sees the Potential. Effective leaders  see the employee’s potential talent versus his current functioning or “state.” This characteristic is not about short-term potential. Instead, it is about a deeper vision or even a dream for the person’s deepest potential — not in one year, but in 10 or 20 years.

4. Uses Listening and Inquiry. Research shows a stylistic preference of effective leaders toward listening and inquiry rather than “telling” and advocacy. They mastered the arts of asking open-ended questions and engaging in a dialogue to seek a greater truth.

5. Delivers a Powerful Message. Effective leaders are masters at coming up with pithy sentences, or what we call “bull’s-eye transactions.” Effective leaders are good at introducing these bull’s-eye transactions when it really matters, not hours or weeks later when the moment has passed.

6. Focuses on the Positive. Effective leaders are good at directing the Mind’s Eye of other people to focus on the positive rather than the negative. They help others to see their potential and the opportunity for learning, even in a crisis or time of difficulty.

7. Encourages Risk-Taking. This characteristic goes beyond acceptance and beyond seeing the potential. It takes those concepts into direct action. Effective leaders actively dare people to unleash their potential by providing tangible opportunities for risk-taking.

8. Inspires Through Intrinsic Motivation. When leaders are invited to talk about the people and events that have influenced them, they do not reference money or financial reward at all. Intrinsic motivation refers to doing something because it is inherently interesting or enjoyable.

9. Signals Accessibility. People believe that their leaders are always accessible and available rather than detached and unavailable or “too busy.” What is important is the perception that the secure base is available if needed.

 

How To Build A High Performance Culture In Organizations

How To Build A High Performance Culture In Organizations

 How To Improve The Performance of Your Organisation

How To Improve The Performance of Your Organisation