TED Tuesday: Lessons in Business

TED Tuesday: Lessons in Business

On TED Tuesday, we will share videos that will inspire you to be a better leader. Learn from thought leaders on subjects of leadership and success. This week, we will share videos on lessons in business.  Hope these videos make your day

Jeff Smith spent a year in prison. But what he discovered inside wasn't what he expected -- he saw in his fellow inmates boundless ingenuity and business savvy. He asks: Why don't we tap this entrepreneurial potential to help ex-prisoners contribute to society once they're back outside? (From the TED Talent Search event TED@NewYork.)

Lisa Gansky, author of "The Mesh," talks about a future of business that's about sharing all kinds of stuff, either via smart and tech-enabled rental or, more boldly, peer-to-peer. Examples across industries -- from music to cars -- show how close we are to this meshy future.

 

What does the future of business look like? In an informative talk, Philip Evans gives a quick primer on two long-standing theories in strategy -- and explains why he thinks they are essentially invalid.

Creativity has never been more essential to competitiveness in the business world, but the critical approach to practical originality in organizations is often lacking. Alan Iny offers a key to think outside the box: apply doubt to the very models and philosophies that make up the box itself.

In the 1970s and 80s, nearly half the Fortune 500 are reported to have used The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)'s Growth Share Matrix to design and operate their strategies. Today, technology is transforming every facet of the business experience. The question arises: Is the Growth Share Matrix still relevant? Sandy Moose, the first female consultant hired by BCG, explains why and how this concept is still relevant and how it can be adapted to current business conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

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